Shiraz Tour

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Shiraz (Persian: شیراز‎‎, Šīrāz) is the sixth-most-populous city of Iran and the capital of Fars Province. Shiraz is located in the south-west of Iran on the "Roodkhaneye Khoshk" (The Dry River) seasonal river. It has a moderate climate and has been a regional trade center for over a thousand years. Shiraz is one of the oldest cities of ancient Persia.

In the 13th century, Shiraz became a leading center of the arts and letters, due to the encouragement of its ruler and the presence of many Persian scholars and artists. It was the capital of Persia during the Zand dynasty from 1750 until 1800.

Two famous poets of Iran, “Hafez’ and “Saadi” are from Shiraz, whose tombs are on the north side of the current city boundaries.

Shiraz is known as the city of poets, literature and flowers. It is also considered by many Iranians to be the city of gardens, due to the many gardens and fruit trees that can be seen in the city.

The crafts of Shiraz consist of inlaid mosaic work of triangular design; silver-ware; pile carpet-weaving and weaving of kilim, called gilim and jajim in the villages and among the tribes.

Kind of Services:

 - Flights from Tehran to Shiraz and vice versa with Mahan Airlines

 - Transfer from airport to hotel and vice versa and inside the city

 - 5 Star hotel with a Single Room per night

 - All meals include breakfast, lunch and dinner

 - Shiraz VIP Tour with an English leader

 

The visiting places are as follows:

“Vakil” Bath and Bazaar

 

Vakil Bath is an old public bath in Shiraz. It was a part of the royal district constructed during Karim Khan Zand's reign, which includes Arg of Karim Khan, Vakil Bazaar, Vakil Mosque and many administrative buildings.The monument is inscribed with the number 917 on the list of national works of Iran.

 

Vakil Bazaar is the main bazaar of Shiraz, located in the historical center of the city. It is thought that the market originally was established in the 11th century AD, and was completed mainly by the Atabaks of Fars, and was renamed after Karim Khan Zand only in the 18th century.

The bazaar has beautiful courtyards, caravansarais, bath houses, and old shops which are deemed among the best places in Shiraz to buy all kinds of Persian rugs, spices, copper handicrafts and antiques.

 

Hafezieh (The tomb of the poet Hafez)

The Tomb of Hafez (one of the greatests Iranian poets of all times) and its associated memorial hall known as Hafezieh, are two memorial structures erected in the northern edge of Shiraz city. The open pavilion structures are situated in the Musalla Gardens on the north bank of a seasonal river and house marble tomb of Hafez. The present buildings, built in 1935 and designed by the French architect and archaeologist Andre Godard, are at the site of previous structure, he best-known of which was built in 1773.

 

The “Shahcheragh “ Mausoleum

Shāh-é-Chérāgh is Persian for "King of the Light" due to the nature of the discovery of the site and is a funerary monument and mosque in Shiraz, Iran, housing the tomb of the brothers Ahmad and Muhammad, sons of Mūsā al-Kādhim and brothers of ‘Alī ar-Ridhā. The two took refuge in the city during the Abbasid persecution of Shia Muslims.

 

The “Eram” Garden called as “BAGH-E ERAM”

Eram Garden is a historic Persian garden in Shiraz. The garden, and the building within it, are located at the northern shore of the Khoshk River in the Fars province. Both the building and the garden were built during the middle of thirteenth century by the Ilkhanate or a paramount chief of the Qashqai tribes of Pars. Over its 150 years the structure has been modified, restored or stylistically changed by various participants. It was one of the properties of noble Shiraz Qavami Family.The building faces south along the long axis. It was designed by a local architect, Haji Mohammad Hasan. The structure housed 32 rooms on two stories, decorated by tiles with poems from the poet Hafez written on them. The structure underwent renovation during the Zand and Qajar dynasties.

Today, Eram Garden and building are within Shiraz Botanical Garden (established 1983) of Shiraz University. They are open to the public as a historic landscape garden. They are World Heritage Site, and protected by Iran's Cultural Heritage Organization.

 

Naqsh-E Rostam

Naqsh-e Rostam is an ancient necropolis located about 12 km northwest of Persepolis, in Fars Province, Iran, with a group of ancient Iranian rock reliefs cut into the cliff, from both the Achaemenid and Sassanid periods. The oldest relief at Naqsh-e Rostam dates back to c. 1000 BC. Though it is severely damaged, it depicts a faint image of a man with unusual head-gear, and is thought to be Elamite in origin. The depiction is part of a larger mural, most of which was removed at the command of Bahram II. The man with the unusual cap gives the site its name, Naqsh-e Rostam ("Rostam Relief" or " Relief of Rostam"), because the relief was locally believed to be a depiction of the mythical hero Rostam.

 

Persepolis

also known as Takht-e-Jamshid "Throne of Jamshid", was the ceremonial capital of the Achaemenid Empire (ca. 550–330 BC).

Persepolis is situated 60 km northeast of the city of Shiraz in Fars Province. The earliest remains of Persepolis date back to 515 BC. It exemplifies the Achaemenid style of architecture. UNESCO declared the ruins of Persepolis a World Heritage Site in 1979.

Ruins of a number of colossal buildings exist on the terrace. All are constructed of dark-grey marble. Fifteen of their pillars stand intact. Three more pillars have been re-erected since 1970 AD. Several of the buildings were never finished.

Since the time of Pietro Della Valle, it has been beyond dispute that these ruins represent the Persepolis captured and partly destroyed by Alexander the Great.

 

Pasargadae

Pasargadae was the capital of the Achaemenid Empire under Cyrus the Great who had issued its construction (559–530 BC); it was also the location of his tomb. It was a city in ancient Persia, located near the city of Shiraz (in Pasargad County), and is today an archaeological site and one of Iran's UNESCO World Heritage Sites.

Cyrus the Great began building the capital in 546 BC or later; it was unfinished when he died in battle, in 530 or 529 BC. The remains of the tomb of Cyrus' son and successor Cambyses II have been found in Pasargadae, near the fortress of Toll-e Takht, and identified in 2006.[2]

Pasargadae remained the capital of the Achaemenid empire until Cambyses II moved it to Susa; later, Darius founded another in Persepolis. The archaeological site covers 1.6 square kilometres and includes a structure commonly believed to be the mausoleum of Cyrus, the fortress of Toll-e Takht sitting on top of a nearby hill, and the remains of two royal palaces and gardens. Pasargadae Persian Gardens provide the earliest known example of the Persian chahar bagh, or fourfold garden design. The most important monument in Pasargadae is the tomb of Cyrus the Great.